Wednesday, 7 July 2010

More heraldry in Holy Trinity, Kendal

More heraldry in Holy Trinity in Kendal

Hidden in the high ceiling of the Parr chapel in the South Eastern corner of the church, are a number of small wooden shields depicting the arms of some of the most important families in the Kendal area. As you stand looking at the Eastern end of the church, cast your eyes sky-ward, and along each side, where the wall meets the roof, the shields can be seen. There are also a number of 'maiden's heads', traditionally said to be the crest of the Parr family. Also to be seen, are four shields on the top of Sir Roger and Lady Margaret Bellingham's tomb, to be found in the Bellingham chapel at the North Eastern end of the church. It is these shields that are shown below first.

The Bellingham Chapel.

The Bellingham Chapel is to be found in what has now been adopted as the Memorial Chapel of the Border Regiment (their arms can be seen in the window) The Bellingham tomb belongs to Sir Roger and Lady Margaret Bellingham. The brasses now to be seen on top of the tomb are replicas of the originals, which were stolen in the 17th century. The brass at the foot of the tomb (not shown here) contains the following epitaph "Here under lyeth Sir Roger Bellingham, Knt. (which of his own proper costs and charges builded the chapell of our Lady within this church of Kendall), and of Margaret, his wife, daur. of Sir Robert Aske, Knight, and of Elizabeth, his wife, daur. to the Lord John Clifford, now created Earl of Cumberland, which Sir Roger died the 18th day of July, A.D. 1533, and the sd. Margaret dyed the - day of - , A.D. 15 -, whose souls Jhesu pardon"

On the wall next to the tomb, is a brass dating from 1577, and commemorates Sir Alan Bellingham.

Above. A shield bearing the arms of the Bellinghams of Levens.

The bugles in this shield represent the senior branch of the Bellingham family of Levens Hall. A nice simple coat of arms to identify.

Above. A shield bearing the arms of the Bellingham and Burneside families.

This shield is split into quarters. The top left and bottom right quarters each contain the three bugles which represent the senior line of the Bellingham family of Levens Hall. The top right and bottom left quarters, contain the arms of the Burneside family....diagonal lines with a lion in the top left of the shield.

Above. A shield bearing the arms of the Moulton family (or Multon)

This is another simple coat of arms to identify. The shield is split by horizontal bands, and in the center, a 'golden annulet' represented by the ring.

Above. Shield bearing the arms of the Bellingham, Burneside and Gilpin families.

Another complicated shield, this time with five parts to it. Firstly, the entire right hand side of the shield is occupied by the Gilpin arms....a boar under a tree. The left hand side of the shield is split as follows: Bottom left and top right, contains the arms of the Burneside family. The top left and bottom right contain the three bugles of the Bellingham family of Levens Hall.

The Parr Chapel.

The Parr chapel dates from the 14th century, and is perhaps the 'busiest' part of the entire church where heraldic devices are concerned. There are a total of 15 shields in this chapel alone, all mounted high on the wall.

Above. Fitting that this shield is in the Parr chapel....these are the arms of Queen Katherine Parr.

Her arms as Queen consort can be seen at this link. Check this link for a short biography of Katherine Parr.

Above. An unidentified coat of arms, but with familiar elements.

This shield ultimately portrays a member of the Parr family's arms...though I've not been able to identify just who's it is. It is nearly the same as Sir Thomas Parr's, though there are subtle differences in the top left quarter.


Above. The Ros of Wark arms quartered with the Parr arms.

I've not been able to identify the individual that would have owned these arms...but the shield is quartered as follows: Top left and bottom right bears the arms of the Parr family. Top right and bottom left bears the arms of the Ros family of Wark.

Above. A shield depicting the arms of the Parr family of Kendal.

The top right hand quarter of this shield, contains the arms of the Fitzhugh family. The bottom right hand quarter contains the Ros family arms. The top left quarter contains the arms of the Parr family, and the bottom left quarter contains the arms of the Marmion family.

Above. A shield depicting the arms of the Ros family of Wark.

The arms for the Ros family shows three 'water bougets' which I think were leather bags for carrying water in.

Above. A shield depicting the arms of the de Lancaster family.

The following seven photos show the maiden heads that can be found on four of the small wooden shields, and three on the walls. There is a fourth carved maiden's head, on one of the pillars, though this hasn't been photographed yet.







The maiden heads were traditionally the badge of the Parr family, and they are certainly well represented here. The representations of the maiden on the wooden shields are far more decorative and intricate than their stone carved counterparts.

2 comments:

Lady Parr said...

Hi, I think I can help you with identification of some of the arms. The Parr Chapel picture 2: quarterings of Parr [top left]; FitzHugh [right of Parr]; Green [to the right of FitzHugh, Katherine's mother's family. Her mother, Maud, was co-heiress to her father along with her sister Anne]; so it must be someone descended from those two lines. They could be that of Queen Katherine's brother, the Marquess of Northampton. The stall plate for the Order of the Garter has those arms. His stall plate has more quarterings though. It seems that this coat is the top half. Perhaps before he became Marquess or Earl of Essex? Picture 4 could be Sir William Parr and Elizabeth Ros.

Lady Parr said...

Also, I run a Queen Katherine Facebook page; http:www.facebook.com/Queen.Catherine.Parr - could I include your pictures on there with credit to you?